MYTH #3: LASIK Makes Your Night Vision Worse

FACT: LASIK Does Not Affect Night Vision, and May Even Improve it.

In two FDA-sponsored studies, PROWL-1 and PROWL-2, the presence of glare and halos was dramatically reduced with patients’ spectacle-free vision 3 months after LASIK as compared with their presence preoperatively with glasses, and this effect was enhanced over further time.  Additionally, no patient in either group experienced significant ghosting after surgery as compared to beforehand. [1]
Another study showed that 88% of pilots who land on aircraft carriers at night found their night vision to be better after LASIK with no glasses than they did with their glasses before surgery. [2]

Glare, halo, starburst, and ghosting were less common after LASIK compared to before LASIK.

Symptoms & Satisfaction of  Patient-Reported Outcomes With LASIK (PROWL) Studies

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Amongst 633 active-duty naval aviators who were treated with modern LASIK, 99.6% would recommend the treatment to others...

and 95% stated that LASIK had helped them be more effective at their job.  

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Title: PROWL-1 and PROWL-2

Article: “Symptoms and Satisfaction of Patients in the Patient-Reported Outcomes With Laser In Situ Keratomileusis (PROWL) Studies”

Authors: Malvina Eydelman, MD1; Gene Hilmantel, OD, MS1; Michelle E. Tarver, MD, PhD; Elizabeth M. Hofmeister, MD; Jeanine May, PhD; Keri Hammel, MS; Ron D. Hays, PhD; Frederick Ferris III, MD

Précis: Across the PROWL-1 and PROWL-2 FDA-sponsored studies of patient reported outcomes, 573 total participants reported their vision and dry eye experiences 3 and 6 months after LASIK. A significant percentage (around 45%) noted new dry eye symptoms at 3 months. However, these improved significantly over time, and vision and dry eye were better on average at 6 months than prior to surgery. Conversely, patients who reported they had preoperative dry eye symptoms were three times more likely to improve their symptoms after LASIK than patients were to develop new symptoms of dry eyes. Glare, halo, starburst, and ghosting were less common after LASIK compared to before, demonstrating improvement in vision quality for most patients.

Abstract: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2587831

Full reference: Eydelman M, Hilmantel G, Tarver ME, et al. Symptoms and Satisfaction of Patients in the Patient-Reported Outcomes With Laser In Situ Keratomileusis (PROWL) Studies. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2017;135(1):13–22. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2016.4587

Keywords: LASIK, PROWL, Refractive Surgery

Title: LASIK in Naval
Aviators

Article: “Laser in situ keratomileusis in United States Naval aviators”

Authors: Tanzer DJ1, Brunstetter T, Zeber R, Hofmeister E, Kaupp S, Kelly N, Mirzaoff M, Sray W, Brown M, Schallhorn S.

Précis: Amongst 633 active-duty naval aviators who were treated with modern LASIK, 99.6% would recommend the treatment to others and 95% stated that LASIK had helped them be more effective at their job.  Uncorrected vision was 20/20 for 98.3% of nearsighted and 95.7% of farsighted eyes by 3 months after surgery, and more than 1 in 3 gained at least 1 line of vision while just 0.4% (2 eyes) lost any vision.  Night vision after LASIK was reported to better than pre-surgery with glasses by 88% amongst these pilots whose job requirements include landing on aircraft carriers at night.

Abstract: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23664357

Full reference: Tanzer DJ, Brunstetter T, Zeber R, et al. Laser in situ keratomileusis in United States Naval aviators. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2013;39(7):1047-1058

Keywords: LASIK, Refractive Surgery

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